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How Does Balloon Sinuplasty Work?

Choosing balloon sinuplasty is an important decision. That’s why we want to provide you with all the information you need to make an informed choice. Learn everything you need to know about getting sinus relief from this simple procedure, including:

  • What you can expect from the balloon sinuplasty procedure
  • How long it takes to recover from balloon sinuplasty
  • What others who have had balloon sinuplasty think about the procedure and their results

What Can I Expect From Balloon Sinuplasty?

The balloon sinuplasty procedure is fast, comfortable, and convenient. It’s done in the sinus doctor’s office and effectively opens your sinus pathway for long-term relief. You’ll notice clearer breathing, improved sleep, fewer sinus infections, and a better quality of life — without medication.

Here’s how balloon sinuplasty works:

  • The physician places a small balloon in the sinus opening
  • The balloon is gently inflated for about five seconds to expand the opening and restore drainage
  • The balloon is deflated and removed
  • The physician treats the next sinus passageway as needed

What to Expect During the Balloon Sinuplasty Procedure

Balloon sinuplasty is a comfortable and simple in-office procedure that takes about one hour. Once you arrive for the procedure:

  • Your nose will be sprayed with more decongestant and a local anesthetic to ensure your comfort.
  • A small amount of another anesthetic will be applied on a gauze or pledget and placed on targeted areas.
  • The gauze or pledget will be removed, and an anesthetic will be applied via injection, similar to a dental procedure numbing process.
  • Within 30 minutes, the procedure will begin. A thin instrument with the balloon is guided through your nasal passages to your sinus.
  • Once positioned, the balloon will be gently inflated with saline for five seconds and then deflated. You will feel a firm pressure and may hear a crackling sound.
  • The balloon may be repositioned and inflated again.
  • When your sinus is open, the instrument and balloon are removed.

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